Def Jam Issues Statement On DMX’s Death

RIP DMX

Earl Simmons, the rapper/songwriter/actor known globally as DMX, has died. He was 50 years old. Simmons had been hospitalized in White Plains, NY after he suffered a heart attack. Def Jam Recordings has issued the following statement on his passing:

Def Jam Recordings and the extended Def Jam family of artists, executives and employees are deeply and profoundly saddened by the loss of our brother Earl “DMX” Simmons. DMX was a brilliant artist and an inspiration to millions around the world. His message of triumph over struggle, his search for the light out of darkness, his pursuit of truth and grace brought us closer to our own humanity. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and all those who loved him and were touched by him. DMX was nothing less than a giant. His legend will live on forever.

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Ken Ishii, Greencross & Different Is Different Team Up To Mint ‘Collusion NFT’ Collection

Ken-Ishii-Greencross-Collusion-33

“Collusion 33,” the first collaboration from techno artists Ken Ishii and Greencross and Different Is Different RecordsCollusion NFT series, will be minted and made available for purchase today via Mintbase Fiundation at 3:30 PM Central European Time.

The premise of the nine-part series is that each producer creates a track, then “colludes to remix each other’s originals and deliver it as a four-track release.”

Each NFT has its own 33-second animation created by Federico Bebber, an acclaimed Italian VFX and 3D artist. To view the entire nine-part animation, you will need to watch each track’s animations in order.

With the purchase of each non-fungible token (NFT), collectors — who will own 33 percent of the publishing rights — will unlock the master file for the track in lossless WAV, plus a 4K video file of the animation.

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The Avalanches’ 20th Anniversary Deluxe Edition of ‘Since I Left You’ Features Unreleased Remixes

The Avalanches Since I Left You Deluxe Edition

Australian electronic music outfit The Avalanches have announced the upcoming release of a deluxe edition of Since I Left You to commemorate the 20th anniversary of their landmark album on June 4. The full-length was originally released by Modular Recordings in 2000 and the U.S. and U.K. in 2001 to massive critical acclaim.

Now before the cynical among us cry “cash grab,” what’s notable about the package is that it features previously unreleased remixes by MF DOOM, Black Dice, Leon Vynehall, Sinkane and Carl Craig.

To whet fans’ appetite, the enigmatic Australian outfit led by Robbie Chater and Tony Diblasi has released Prince Paul‘s remix of “Since I Left You.”

Talking about the group’s historic album, Chater reflected: “I remember very clearly a few things. We decided to not have any of our voices on it, which made it last because it’s a kind of transmission; nothing date-stamps it to that time. Also we were careful not to use any trendy software from 1999 or 2000. So it does seem to just float around in time…”

“Music lovers get it, and that’s what we ultimately are,” he continues. “It’s almost like an exploration of our relationship with the world and with music and, as music fans, what our place is in the whole process. Looking back, I’m proud of this record as a pure expression of joy and love, heart on its sleeve and is free from irony.” Continue Reading

UK Record Label Young Turks Changes Name to Young

Young Records logo

Young Turks, the pioneering British record label launched by Caius Pawson in 2006 known for releasing music by The xx, Jamie xx, FKA twigs and Kamasi Washington, announced today it had changed its name to Young.

Taking to Instagram, Pawson said the change in moniker came after “a long period of reflection and I wanted to explain the origins of the Young Turks name and the reasons for the change.

He added, “We originally named Young Turks after the Rod Stewart song of the same name. When I first heard the song, it took a week of 2005-era internet searches to find out what it was and even longer to understand its meaning. The name intrigued me, evoking the solidarity of youth. In 2005, it seemed to perfectly sum up what we were: teenagers, wanting and waiting to do something, anything.”

“However, we were unaware of the deeper history of the term and, specifically, that the Young Turks were a group who carried out the Armenian Genocide from 1915 onwards. Through ongoing conversations and messages that have developed our own knowledge around the subject, it’s become apparent that the name is a source of hurt and confusion for people. We loved the name for what it meant to us, but in retrospect should have listened more carefully to other voices and acted more quickly. We have always tried to affect positive change and knowing what we do now, it’s only right that we change our name.”

Ahead of the commemoration of the 1915 Armenian Genocide on April 24, the label has made a donation to the Armenian Institute based in London.

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