Kaos Nightclub in Las Vegas Shutters After Wild 7-Month Ride

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Red Rock Resorts, owners of 100,000 square-foot Kaos dayclub and nightclub in Las Vegas, have shuttered the club just seven months after the Palms Hotel celebrated the venue’s extravagant grand opening.

The closure comes after the departure of Jon Gray, the vice president and general manager of the Palms, and cancelation of DJ Marshmello‘s $60 million residency.

The decision to shutter Kaos, which recently had a $690 million renovation and features artwork by Damien Hirst, came after a net loss of $26.8 million in the third quarter, down $51.9 million from the same period last year.

Michael Britt, senior vice president of government relations and corporate communications for Rock Resorts Inc., said in a statement: “This afternoon, Red Rock Resorts, Inc. announced the closing of Kaos dayclub and nightclub at the Palms Casino Resort, effective immediately. While Palms has experienced exceptional growth across both the gaming and non-gaming segments of the business, the expense side of the business has been challenging to date, due in large part to the entertainment and fixed cost structure associated with Kaos. Therefore, we have decided to take some time to reassess the programming and use of those venues going forward. In the interim, we intend to use the venues for private meeting space and special events, in addition to everyday resort pool operations.”

“It’s obvious that the nightclub environment in Vegas is extremely competitive. It doesn’t appear that the market has grown enough for the amount of supply in the market,” said Red Rock CEO Frank Fertitta III during a call to investors. “The cost of entertainment is excessively high, and we just made the decision to focus where the fish are and acknowledge that the nightclub business, at least at the Palms, was not working for us.”

The fate of the space is currently being decided. In the interim, it will reportedly used for events.

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See the First Playable Record Made From Recycled Ocean Plastic

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Cornwall, England-based Sharp’s Brewery, Mercury Music Prize nominated artist Nick Mulvey (a founding member of the band Portico Quartet), Keynvor and vinyl manufacturer Tangible Formats have teamed up to create the first record composed of recycled single-use plastic.

Titled “In the Anthropocene,” the 10-inch record is made from plastics found along the coastline of Cornwall. Sales of the physical record proceeds from digital streams will benefit Surfers Against Sewage, a UK-based organization working to save British coastlines from pollution.

Obligatory press release gush from Sharp’s Brewery’s James Nicholls: “Cornish culture is built around the ocean – whether that’s seafood, surfing or even our own Atlantic Ale. Last year, we helped the ocean enter the charts, under Keynvor – which means ‘Ocean’ in the Cornish language. I’m excited to say that today we’re really turning the tables on the music industry by releasing ‘In the Anthropocene’, with Nick Mulvey – by upcycling single-use plastic found on our beaches and turning it into playable ‘ocean vinyl.’”

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Obligatory press release gush from Nick Mulvey: “I’ve always loved the wildness of the Cornish coast and it feeds something deep in me every time I’m there. My music is about knowing who – or what – we are, right at the core. Aliveness itself, conscious. These times of urgent global crisis are demanding we re-examine ourselves and the world and raise ourselves to match the Earth, this wonder-organism from which we are not, and never have been, separate.”

Obligatory press release gush from Hugo Tagholm, CEO of Surfers Against Sewage: “We are excited to be partnering with Sharp’s Brewery again to raise vital funds to protect our coastlines from plastic pollution and other environmental hazards. Keynvor, as a musical artist, and the new ‘ocean vinyl’, which uses plastic pollution and turns it into something positive, is a powerful way to help us raise money and continue to spread our message.”

Noisia, Pioneering Electronic Music Trio, Breaks Up

Noisia Split

Noisia, the revered Dutch electronic-music trio known for blazing new trails in drum ‘n’ bass and dubstep, are calling it a day.

In a statement issued today to (below), Thijs de Vlieger, Nik Roos, and Martijn van Sonderen said that the time is right to pack it in at the end of 2020.

After 20 years of being Noisia, we are ready to become something new.

We’ve all grown, as people and as musicians. For almost 20 years, all three of us wanted pretty much the same, but we’ve developed, and realized that nowadays we want different things. If we all wanted the same different things, it would make sense to do that as a different Noisia, but we want different different things.

That’s why we’ve decided that for us, and our listeners, it’s the most honorable and respectful choice to put an end to this chapter, and start the next one. Noisia has always been about making as few compromises as we can. When Noisia becomes a compromise in itself, it’s time to move on.

We’ve tried to realign ourselves over the last few years to keep the wagon on the rails, but the reality still is: we are not who we were before, and the time of doing everything together because we all want the same is behind us.

Noisia is a game that we’ve completed. There’s very little left for us to explore together. Noisia is a beautifully consolidated shape. And we want to leave Noisia in that shape, rather than keep chiselling at it, with the risk of ruining it. A good artist should know when an artwork is finished.

What the future holds for us, we honestly don’t know. We still have our studios in the same space, and we will run into each other every day. We are still friends. We will still make music together in some shape or form.

We want to celebrate our 20th year and the past 20 years together with everyone who’s been involved and made it all possible. We want to go out with a blast and say goodbye to our fans properly, so that we can look back and say “it was an amazing era, and we finished it in style”. We want to do one last year of touring DJ shows, one last year of Noisia Radio, and finish and release the music that we’ve been working on together.

This was a very hard decision to make, but we thought about it for a long time and it feels like the only right thing to do for us without breaking what we’ve built.

We are very proud of what we’ve done. We’re incredibly grateful for the opportunity we were given to share our music and vision with so many people, and we feel greatly indebted to all those who helped us along the way. We’re excited about making the last year as Noisia as memorable as we can, and we’re curious to see what will come after.

TL;DR: We’ve decided to stop being Noisia at the end of 2020.

Gibson Returns Trademark to Synth Pioneer Tom Oberheim

Tom Oberheim Gets Name Back from Gibson

Gibson, a company known internationally for its lineup of signature electric guitars including the Les Paul and SG, announced today that it had returned the Oberheim trademark to company founder and synth pioneer Tom Oberheim.

According to a statement issued by Gibson, the move was instigated after a chance meeting between Gibson president and CEO James ‘JC’ Curleigh and Oberheim at Winter NAMM.

“Of the many stories I have heard and decisions I have made since joining Gibson, this situation seemed simple,” said Curleigh. “Let’s do the right thing by putting the Oberheim brand back in the hands of its namesake founder Tom Oberheim.”

“After over thirty years of being without it, I am thrilled to once again be able to use the Oberheim trademark for my products,” said Tom Oberheim. “I am very grateful to the new leadership team of Gibson for making this possible.”

The Oberheim company first produced the OB-X in 1979, the OBXA in 1980-81, and the OB8 in 1983, as well as the Matrix 12, Matrix 6 and Matrix 1000 from the mid-1980s.

The OB-X was used on classic albums, ranging from Rush‘s Moving Pictures and Signals to Madonna‘s debut album. Prince, Harold Faltermeyer, Van Halen and Jean-Michel Jarre were also Oberheim enthusiasts.

Gibson is coming out of a tumultuous time. After surfacing from bankruptcy in 2018 the instrument company had a reported $200 million in debt. This month Gibson announced new creative collaboration agreements with boutique guitar makers as well as the opening of its new headquarters in Downtown Nashville.