Skrillex and Diplo Played Secret L.A. Party Last Night For DANCE (RED), Save Lives [Gallery]

Skrillex and Diplo at RED DANCE

Last night Grammy nominees Skrillex, Diplo, Kaskade, Nero and Tommy Trash played a secret pre-Grammy party in Los Angeles at the AT&T Building. The bash featuring the cadre of respected DJs had a noble purpose: to raise awareness of DANCE (RED), Save Lives, the electronic music branch of Bono and Bobby Shriver’s RED charity that’s engaging businesses in the global fight against AIDS. It was an intimate evening to say the least: only 20 sets of four tickets to the private event were auctioned off via global charity auction site Charitybuzz.com. An auction featuring loads of memorabilia and the opportunity to meet artists from many genres ends tonight. If the auction is too rich for your blood (or you simply don’t fancy paying a few grand to hang out with Steven Tyler or Barry Manilow), then take the path of least resistance by purchasing the DANCE (RED), Save Lives Presented By Tiësto album.

Photos by Getty Images

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105 Arrested at HARD Summer

With a lineup boasting many of the usual DJ suspects (Skrillex, Nero, James Murphy) and a few interesting left-of-center choices (Squarepusher, Bootsy Collins), the two-day HARD Summer Music Festival held this weekend at L.A. State Historic Park near Chinatown had the dubious distinction of having over 105 arrests, according to the L.A. Weekly. The massive number of arrests included 9 busts for drugs. A city official reported 22 minor medical incidents and four hospitalizations for people believed to be under the influence of drugs. At HARD’s 2011 installment, there were 31 “medical emergencies” at the dance music fest, according to the LAFD, with 17 arrests.

In related news, two people died and 19 others were hospitalized on Thursday during the Mansfield, MA stop of roving U.S. electronic summer music tour IDentity Festival held at the Comcast Center featuring Eric Prydz, Paul van Dyk and Wolfgang Gartner.

Image via Facebook

Big Shot Guest Mix: Dirtyloud

We’ve been following Brazil’s Dirtyloud for the better part of two years, and we marvel how their hard work and inspired musical ethos has allowed them to take their rightful place on the global DJ stage. The boys continue to keep their electro-bass party going in 2012, issuing their new single, “Dae Gaetta,” for Tim Healey’s Surfer Rosa label, and recently remixing Porter Robinson’s “Spitfire.” Even though they’re crisscrossing the world with DJ gigs supporting their new release, they found time to craft their second Big Shot Guest Mix (check out their 2010 mix here). This exclusive session features poppin’ tunes from Nero, Lazy Rich and Gemini as well as their latest single. Warning: it might get loud! Download and enjoy.

Big Shot Guest Mix: Dirtyloud by Big Shot Magazine on Mixcloud

Big Shot Guest Mix: Dirtyloud

1. Nero / “Must Be The Feeling” (Original Mix)
2. Dirtyloud / “Dae Gaetta” (Original Mix)
3. Kevin Doherty / “Lifeline Feat Amba Shepherd (Rocket Pimp Remix)
4. Borgore feat. Shay / “Flex” (Document One Remix)
5. Gemini (UK) / “Fire Inside” (Original Mix)
6. Far Too Loud / “Desibel” (Club Mix)
7. Marco V / “Analogital” (Hard Rock Sofa)
8. Polina, Angger Dimas / “Release Me” (Vandalism Remix)
9. Martin Solveig / “The Night Out” (TheFatRat Remix)
10. Hardwell, Dannic / “Kontiki” (Dyro Remix)
11. Lazy Rich / “The Chase Feat Belle Humble” (Original MIx)
12. Laidback Luke, Arno Cost, Norman Doray / “Trilogy” (GTA Bigroom Mix)

HARD Summer Lineup Announced

The fifth annual HARD Summer, taking place at downtown’s Los Angeles State Historic Park August 3-4, 2012, has announced its lineup. The two-day blowout — HARD’s first in its five-year history — include lots of big-name acts. Bloc Party, Boys Noize and Miike Snow headline Friday night (August 3) and Skrillex, Nero and The Bloody Beetroots share the top slot on Saturday night (August 4). Over 50 acts spanning a wealth of dance floor styles — a disparate list including Little Dragon, Breakbot, Araabmuzik, Joey Beltram and Nick Thayer — round out the bill. Check out the lineup below.

Friday, August 3:
Bloc Party, Boys Noize, Miike Snow (Live), Chromeo (DJ Set), Little Dragon, Magnetic Man, Erol Alkan, Bootsy Collins & The Funk Unity Band, Fake Blood, Gesaffelstein (Live), Breakbot, Buraka Som Sistema, Araabmuzik, Joey Beltram, Craze, Alex Metric, Surkin, John Talabot (DJ Set), Danny Brown, Action Bronson, Riton, Oliver, Jokers Of The Scene, Light Year, Nick Catchdubs, Jim-E Stack, Mr. Muthafuckin’ Exquire, Brenmar, Baio, Sound Pellegrino Thermal Team

Saturday, August 4:
Skrillex, Nero (Live), Bloody Beetroots (DJ Set), Squarepusher, A-Trak, James Murphy (Dj Set), Datsik, 12th Planet, Zedd, Dillon Francis, Brodinski, Claude Vonstroke, Birdy Nam Nam, Justin Martin, Gaslamp Killer, Trolley Snatcha, Destructo, Alvin Risk, Zombie Disco Squad, DJ Antention, Codes, Huoratron, Kill Frenzy, Smims & Belle, Jason Bentley, Lunice, Nick Thayer, Amtrac, The Starship Connection

Photek, RJD2, Nero Raise the Roof at Together Festival

The weeklong Together festival took another step forward with a dizzying week of concerts, parties, workshops and film showings that drew an estimated 20,000 fans to dozens of venues across Boston and Cambridge.

With an impressive lineup that included Photek, Dubfire, Nero, Starkey, Poirier and RJD2 (pictured above), to name a few, the festival — now in its third year — forged several new partnerships with top EDM labels that bodes well for the event moving forward. Tastemaking labels !K7 and Ninja Tune threw showcases while Astralwerks used the festival for its New England premier of The Chemical Brothers’ acclaimed new concert film, Don’t Think.

“Execution, attendance and affiliations (with labels) put us at a whole new level in the pantheon of music festivals,” organizer David Day said. “We’re starting to reach a Sonor or Mutek and we want to be in that conversation of great city festivals. We want to pride ourselves on doing really innovative stuff. We want to be an international festival and we’re a year away from that.”

Organizers estimate that more than 12,000 fans attended parties and concerts at more than 30 venues, while thousands streamed in and out of the Together headquarters all week to attend technology panels, participate in workshops, grab free swag and watch more than 70 local, national and international DJs spinning sets that were livestreamed globally.

Together also shifted its headquarters across the Charles River to Central Square in Boston’s sister city of Cambridge, where officials welcomed the event with open arms and pledged even broader support next year.

Among the highlights were Kill the Noise and Feed Me at Royale, Joe Nice and Kahn at ThinkTank, Poirier and Mala at Good Life, New Orleans’ Big Freedia at Brighton Music Hall and Photek at Machine.

“Hearing his incredible breadth of knowledge in the mix was awesome,” Day said of Photek, whose set was completely packed. “He dropped a couple classics, dropped some brand, new bass music stuff and kind of got it on. That was a great night.”

The Together Center was open for 10 days and the event wrapped up Sunday with a closing party headlined by RJD2. After catching up on some sleep, Day said he’s already thinking about ideas to expand for next year.

“We’re really excited to keep going,” he said.

Image by MGMphoto

Adam F Talks Dubstep and Fusing Genres

As Adam F heads to Miami’s Winter Music Conference and ponders his next studio move, the British DJ/producer/actor says he’s planning to build off the recent successes he’s had with harder acts he’s worked with, like Nero, The Prodigy and Pendulum.

“I’ve spent a lot of time on the label (Breakbeat KAOS) for quite a few years, developing a few acts that we’re real excited about who are now part of the worldwide scene,” he tells Big Shot. “It’s time for me to get back in the studio myself.”

With some prime slots at WMC, and a looming U.S. tour with Caspa later this year, Adam F has given fans a taste of where he might be headed, musically, with his latest single, “When the Rain Is Gone,” a pop-laced, dubstep jaunt, driven by a euphoric hook.

But as the indie mogul who signed Nero and released Pendulum’s first platinum album, Hold Your Colour, he admits a deep dedication to the EDM’s harder, more rock-oriented edge.

“It’s just a different part of me,” he explains. “I like that epic sound — that really edgy, in your face, raw sound, like The Prodigy. It gives me a chance to be less organized within the music. It’s more free to go left with it when you work with people like Prodigy, which is exciting. And obviously people like The Prodigy, they’ve got such a big influence on the dance scene, that you feel you have to step up to the plate to deliver.”

“That’s what dubstep has done. It’s regenerated people’s minds to want to work together. It’s created this new bass music where everything is fused together.”

Adam has also worked with some of hip-hop’s top acts as well — from Redman to Pharaoh Monche to De La Soul to L.L. Cool J.

The L.L. Cool J collaboration, which was on LL’s 2000 smash, G.O.A.T. (The Greatest of All Time), was a true partnership in every sense. Adam not only produced the track, but did backing vocals and spent extensive time in the studio in New York with the rap icon, even rounding up girls from the streets to sing backup.

“That was fucking crazy,” he recalls of the experience. “I grew up with those guys, went to see them. I remember when Def Jam did that tour with Run-DMC, LL, The Beastie Boys. I went to that. So to work with him, that was an amazing experience.”

The hip-hop and rock influence has always made its presence felt in Adam’s music. With dubstep blurring the genre lines even further, he’s heading back into the studio, where he says he’ll toss convention aside and meld several styles into what he hopes will be a new electronic masterpiece.

“The new generation of music lovers and club goers have been less genre-specific than ever before. I’m excited now that so many new genres are fusing together,” he says. “And unlike any other time in club music history, people are going into clubs and hearing such a cross-genre of styles.”

“That’s what dubstep has done. It’s regenerated people’s minds to want to work together. It’s created this new bass music where everything is fused together,” he continues. “That’s why for me, it’s a good time to come back in to make music as Adam F, because it’s quite open now.”