Review: Alix Perez – ‘Chroma Chords’ (Shogun Audio)

Alix Perez Chroma Chords


On his sophomore sojourn, Alix Perez goes round the club, making sure light fittings and bar stools are tightly secured, handing out business cards as a sub-bass handyman with a utility belt full of low-end detonators. Balance is everything to the Belgian, simultaneously weighing up light and heavy within tracks, halving the album into migraine makers and the curiously afloat, and the neon-streaked against the pitch black for club cravers versus headphone retreaters.

Surgical scales become a must when calculating glitch, dubstep, hip-hop and drum & bass as a liquid synthesis armed with megaton weight, where “Playing Games” prepares to dive into Kendrick Lamar’s “Swimming Pools” as the essence of grace under fire. The velvet-crunched “Broken Heart” is up to splashing daintily to a Destiny’s Child sample, charming you amidst maximalist foliage; “Annie’s Song” capitalises on synth elasticity for an R&B wind and grind, and “YDK” slides into post-dubstep with ease.

Laser-guided bunker transmissions “Shadows” and “Move Aside” completely blow the hypercolour off the map, though one gripe is that the gargantuan bass can spread itself too thin. Despite running as a logical multiple threat, unhealthily grimy hip-hop slugger “Monolith,” featuring UK heroes Foreign Beggars and Jehst, shares the same subwoofer lawlessness as “Villains 1 Heroes 0,” “Blueprint” and Phace & Misanthrop scrap “Burn Out.” Why change the swing of a wrecking ball doing its job though? And because of the contrasts working with and against one another, Perez prevails.

File under: Noisia, Spectrasoul, Lapalux

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